• Materia Medica: Spanish Moss (Tillandsia usneoides)

    Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) is best known for its stunning accent to a wooded landscape, but it is neither moss, nor Spanish. Its species name “usneoides” means that it has an appearance like moss – though is not actually a moss, but rather an epiphytic bromeliad, with long threadlike festoons that can grow several feet in length off of tree limbs. It’s genus name is a nod to physician Elias Tillands, who was so afraid of water that he was known to walk several extra miles around a lake rather than take a boat a few hundred feet across. Contrary to popular belief, Spanish moss is not a parasite and does not actually feed off the tree for nutrients or cause it…

  • Herbal Books: Staff Picks!

    A common indulgence amongst all herbalists is none other than herbal books. That insatiable desire to read everything about all the things is real and endless. For some, that’s the initial knowing that herbalism is the path they should should dedicate themselves to. They feel this incredible, almost demanding, urge to sit with herbal information via their most trusted resources. Below our staff shares their most trusted books that have influenced their herbal journey. Chris Flocken, Bookkeeper Extraordinaire – “The Desert Year” by Joseph Wood Krutch   “The flora, the fauna, the topography, the atmospheric conditions of the Sonoran Desert are among my oldest and dearest friends. The valley formed…

  • Plant of the Month November 2017: Feverfew

    Tanacetum parthenium Feverfew has a long history in traditional and folk medicine especially used by the Greeks and Europeans. Nicolas Culpepper is the most famous of herbalist that worked with and documented Feverfew. He says that “Venus commands this herb, and has commended it to succour her sisters (women), to be a general strengthener of their wombs…” Feverfew has a long history of supporting women and their reproductive systems. For an advanced and thorough review, head on over to the US National Library of Medicine to read a systematic review. If you’re like me and are curious of magickal ways to practice with feverfew, check out this feverfew potion from Llewellyn Worldwide. Appearance:  a…

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