Sale!

Advanced Plant Walk at Mead Garden with Emily

$20.00

This class will be geared to the plant enthusiast that has enjoyed plant walks with us in the past. If you would like to get to know plant botany and ethnobotanical uses in our ecosystems in a deeper way, this is the plant walk for you! Along the hike, edible plants and trees are taught as we meander through Mead Gardens.

Be sure to bring your mask, water bottle, and your favorite note taking tools. We will be practicing social distancing health protocols. For the health and safety of the teacher and other attendees we respectfully request masks are worn during the walk if physical distancing isn’t possible.

Tuition: $25

Early Bird Rate: $20, good through 3/5

Class Meets at Mead Gardens
Sunday, March 6, 2022 from 3-5pm

13 in stock

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Description

This class will be geared to the plant enthusiast that has enjoyed plant walks with us in the past. If you would like to get to know plant botany and ethnobotanical uses in our ecosystems in a deeper way, this is the plant walk for you! Along the hike, edible plants and trees are taught as we meander through Mead Gardens. There will be a discussion about the plant/shrub/tree; whether edible or medicinal, other uses with special attention to how botany can be used for identification. This is a hands-on course where tasting, smelling, and feeling are important. It is taught in a fun and practical way to make the experience educational and enjoyable. The hike is easy and level with several stops along the way. Well-behaved children are welcome as students. Most hikes cover 15-20 different species and vary depending on the season of the year. During the hike we will cross through different ecosystems, so you can get a feel for the diversity of Florida’s landscape.

 

Please review this link for our school’s tuition and cancellation policies.

Instructor: Emily Ruff

Photo by Herb Swanson

Emily Ruff, Executive Director, is a community herbalist who has practiced the art and science of plant healing for over a decade. Her studies have taken her around three continents where she has studied under healers of many traditions. Her background in gardening and botany came in childhood while wandering the wilderness and digging in the sandy soils of Florida with her grandfather, a tobacco farmer turned urban gardener, and her father, a botany and astronomy professor. Her journey into herbalism continued through apprenticeships in Guatemala under the tutelage of local healers on the southern coast of Lake Atitlan, in the mountains of Vermont at the feet of Rosemary Gladstar, and in the Central Florida apothecary Leaves & Roots with herbalists Carolyn Whitford and George D’Arcy. Emily’s academic studies include Ethnobotany, Philosophy, and Women’s Studies at the University of Central Florida and Curanderismo with the University of New Mexico. She is a Bach Flower Registered Practitioner.

Emily’s dedication to preserving bioregional medicinal plant traditions and ecosystems led her to become active in the organization United Plant Savers. Inspired by a need for greater connection among her regional community, she founded the Florida Herbal Conference event in 2012, an event that continues to sell out annually. In past years, she served multiple terms as president of the Herb Society of Central Florida and as co-founder of Homegrown Local Food Cooperative. Most recently, in response to the tragic shooting at Pulse Nightclub, Emily founded the Orlando Grief Care Project. From the community relationships cultivated through the national response to this tragedy, Emily formed the Herbal Action Network to continue weaving the web of compassionate herbalism into community engagement. Emily is an instructor in the Herbal Academy Advanced Herbal Training Course. Sharing her time between Florida and Vermont, she currently serves as director of the Sage Mountain Botanical Sanctuary.

Emily’s classes have been described as “heart-filled,” “enriching,” and “empowering,” creating a bridge between the teachings of our ancestors and the technologies of our modern world. Emily can be found in joy cooking, practicing yoga, writing, photographing flora, creating music with family and friends, and digging her fingers in the dirt. The plants continue to be her greatest teachers.

See Emily’s classes at this link.

 

 

 

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